Mid-Panel Adds Versatility to Monumental Doors

Mid-Panel Adds Versatility to Monumental Doors

Our SL-14 and SL-15 are aluminum monumental or stile and rail doors used to create memorable and robust entrances. Whether you choose the standard (SL-14) or wide stile model (SL-15), you have the option to add the SL-484 mid-panel. Why would choose this option?  Simply put, do it for the branding potential.
This 12″ wide mid-panel has a closed-cell foam core, two tie-rods for added strength and an aluminum or FRP skin.  Further, this skin can be branded with your chosen identity—corporate, collegiate, and more.
For example, consider what Drexel University did with their mid-panels.  The university emblem is the dragon.  It finds its way onto all identity materials and takes the form of the school mascot, Mario the Magnificent.  So, why not put it on the entrance doors as well?
Drexel University SL-15 Entrance with mid-panel
What branding ideas do you have in mind?  Share them with us and let’s see how your vision can look on your entrance system.

25 Do’s & Don’ts For Effective Selling at Trade Shows

25 Do’s & Don’ts For Effective Selling at Trade Shows

I’m not sure I’ve ever met a sales professional who really enjoyed working a trade show or related event. But we have to do them. So we might as well learn to do them well. Here’s my list of 25 do’s and 25 don’ts that I have compiled over many years.
Do:
  • get yourself mentally set for a positive, dynamic selling experience. Trade shows are exciting events full of selling opportunities.
  • get yourself physically fit for standing while you are on duty. Select footwear carefully.
  • get a good night’s sleep. Leave the late-night partying to others.
  • get thoroughly briefed on your staff assignment—attire, work schedule, handouts, visiting VIPs, lead management, etc.—well in advance.
  • rehearse your facts and figures so you can make convincing presentations.
  • formulate some open-ended, qualifying questions.
  • practice the art of continuing to probe with qualifying questions. This technique shows genuine interest and is very informative.
  • ensure that your on-duty wardrobe is in keeping with your booth presentation.
  • look your best when you step on to the show floor—hair groomed, shoes shined, clothes neatly pressed.
  • arrive for your duty several minutes ahead of schedule so you don’t create unnecessary worry for your fellow staffers.
  • stand straight in a relaxed pose with hands clasped or at your side.
  • project a warm personality by wearing a smile and using non-threatening conversation.
  • extend a friendly greeting and initiate a good business-like handshake.
  • be courteous to all visitors, gracefully disengaging from those who are not qualified prospects.
  • concentrate on good eye contact throughout the qualification process.
  • listen actively and intently for hidden needs. Let the prospect do most of the talking.
  • be sincere and honest in your presentation. MOST people can see through inflated claims.
  • display genuine enthusiasm for your organization, its products, and services.
  • put all leads and business cards in a secure place with other leads.
  • keep the booth clean, uncluttered, and well organized.
  • take a short break after every two hours of booth duty. A stale staffer is an ineffective representative.
  • be a good neighbor. Make an effort to get to know the staffers in the booths around you and explain your reasons for attending the show. They may send you prospects or be prospects themselves.
  • take time to walk the show, surveying competition and observing other exhibits and exhibitors.
  • make mental notes of how your company’s participation could improve and share appropriately.
  • be on your best behavior throughout. Remember, you and your company are on display 24/7.
Don’t:
  • come to the show with a negative attitude. Instead, take the view that is a positive change of pace.
  • expect your exhibit to sell your products or company. Your job is to use the exhibit as a stage for your presentation.
  • forget your name tag. Pin it on your right lapel or side so it’s easily read while shaking hands.
  • let anything in your personal appearance, such as extreme wardrobe, distract your audience.
  • block access to your booth with people or exhibitry.
  • fold your arms across your chest, put your hands in your pockets or lean or sit on the exhibitry.
  • act like a robot with no feeling about what you are selling.
  • fidget, frown, or look impatient, bored, or tired.
  • eat, drink, chew gum, or comb your hair in the booth.
  • allow literature, briefcases, coats, sales leads, or business cards to clutter the booth.
  • be afraid to initiate a discussion. Attendees expect this.
  • assume anything about the visitor to your booth.
  • be patronizing to any attendee, regardless of age, gender, race, or any identifying characteristic.
  • ask general, dead-end questions such as “May I help you?”
  • disappear from the booth for any reason without explaining your absence to a fellow staffer.
  • talk too much, especially about yourself or company.
  • pass out business cards, literature, sample, or novelties (SWAG) without first qualifying prospects.
  • be tempted to talk at length with poor prospects.
  • waste the time of good prospects. You’ll make a much better impression by respecting their valuable time.
  • hesitate to encourage the prospect to compare your products to others at the show. This sort of confidence usually prevails.
  • forget to close your conversation properly with a qualified prospect by asking a leading question such as “when do you plan to move forward with your purchase?”
  • miss an opportunity at the end of an important discussion to suggest an exchange of business cards or to swipe their badge to the lead management system.
  • put leads or business cards in your pocket where they can get misplaced or not shared with team members.
  • fraternize too much with your competition.
  • underestimate the power of trade shows.

Thermal Barrier Exception

Thermal Barrier Exception

The International Code Council (ICC) is responsible for the International Building Code (IBC).  According to IBC section 2603, foam-filled building products, such as walls and doors, must use an approved thermal barrier between the foam and the interior of the building.
But there are exceptions.  When the door need not be fire rated, it must pass related tests to qualify for an exception.  Recently, we put three of our doors through the tests performed by the ICC Evaluation Service.
All three doors (SL-17, SL-19-1, SL-20) met the test requirements which evaluated the following door properties:
  • surface-burning charateristics
  • wind resistance
  • durability
ICC ES mark
Thus, ESR-1669 was re-issued in December 2017 for these products.

Content: Curate vs Create

Content: Curate vs Create

Blogs are among the best things to share via social media. In fact, blogs themselves are considered social media because they represent a point of view that invites response. Sharing blog posts through other SM networks creates even greater engagement.
But whether you are blogging or trying to generate other SM post content, you may wonder: Do I curate or do I create? The answer is “yes!”

To Curate

Curating content is an acceptable practice and may be necessary at times even for the best of content creators. But a few rules apply:
  • Always and prominently identify the source of the article.
  • When possible, link to the original source.
  • Never reproduce the story in its entirety.
  • Never use all or even most of the articles from a single source.
  • When possible, provide some context for, or comment on, the material you use.
There are good marketing reasons to follow these rules. For example, identifying and linking to sources encourages links back to you and that’s good SEO. And showing that you can curate from a variety of sources and comment intelligently on them, makes you more credible.

To Create

Creating content is always a prefered route to establishing you or your company as THE source of good information. Sometimes, however, the subject matter experts in your company are not the best content creators. (I’m hearing a lot of heads nodding up and down.) The rule is simple: to create good content, you need good content creators.
Content Creation
It may be matter of Marketing interviewing Engineering or Sales writing something that is then “edited by others.” Who gets the by-line? I won’t step into that political pile. But as long as it’s someone in your company, the company will benefit.
Regardless, here’s a quick checklist for “good” content:
  • My title is catchy and appeals to my audience.
  • I am using a keyword-centric approach.
  • I use my keyword(s) in the title and in the body.
  • I also use synonyms for my keywords.
  • Despite this keyword approach, my language sounds natural.
  • I am including two or more relevant links to other content within my site.
  • I have at least one image and is it compatible with my overall brand and site.
  • I use descriptive tags for my images.
  • My post is organized with headings, bulleted lists, or other formatting for readability.
  • I am ending the post with a call to action.
Your content awaits; go curate or create!